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ROBOTICS TRIATHLON

The Robotics Triathlon of the London School of Mathematics and Programming is a cross-platform robotics competition. The event is unusual because it places no constraint on the types of controllers, construction sets or languages used by the teams.

 

Challenges representing the traditional robotics tasks of autonomous navigation, pick-up and delivery, as well as remote controlled operations in a collaborative environment create the opportunity for children to apply their programming and robotics skills.

 

There are three challenges and one bonus task in this competition. Overall score will be calculated as a sum of points from each challenge and the bonus points. Challenges can be attempted several times (see challenge descriptions for details). Teams can take breaks between those attempts to modify robot or code of the robot. Recommended size of the team is one to three students.

 

The event will take place on Sunday 24 June 2018 at our Kensington School based at the Russian Cultural Center (Rossotrudnichestvo): First Floor, 37 Kensington High Street, London W8 5ED. Event starts at 11:00 in the morning, awards ceremony is planned at around 17:00.

 

Practice Sessions

Robots will be able to attempt the challenges on practice fields in the morning session of the event. Practice fields will be available throughout the day, if they are not used for scoring the challenges of other teams.

 

Sunday 24 June 2018

CROSS-PLATFORM ROBOTICS TRIATHLON

Sunday 24 June 2018

COMPETITION

CHALLENGES

There are three challenges in this competition. Overall score will be calculated as a sum of points from each challenge.

Challenge 1: Line Following

 

Aim of the challenge

A robot should autonomously travel along a black line on a white background as fast as possible. The line is 50 mm wide, and is printed in such a way that there is at least 15 cm between the line and the border of the printed field.

 

Ranking and points

There will be 5 minutes for a robot to finish the course. Each robot will have 3 attempts; each attempt will be timed separately, and the best time will be used for ranking.

 

In case a robot leaves the black line (no part of the robot is above the black line) or needs to be rescued, an attempt is considered failed, and a next attempt can be taken (if there are any remaining). If a robot does not manage to complete the course in 3 attempts, it will be given 0 points for this competition.

Challenge 3: Really Small Maze

 

Aim of the challenge

A robot should navigate a maze autonomously as fast as possible without hitting the walls. Map of the maze is shown below. Actual dimensions of the maze will be within plus-minus 2 cm of what is shown on the map. At the beginning of this task the robot will be placed inside the maze, in the lower left corner. The robot will need to use sensors to avoid contact with the walls, and reach the upper right corner. For each contact with a wall the robot will be penalized by 10 seconds, but this penalty will be limited by a total of 30 seconds.

 

Design of the maze is following one half of "The Minimal Maze" challenge of the "Pi Wars" competition in Cambridge, UK.

 

Robot starts in the lower left corner of the maze, and should reach the top right corner. Dimensions shown are in millimeters. Height of the maze walls is around 63 millimeters. Wood for construction of this maze can be bought in a B&Q shop, where it is sold as "CIs timber (t)38mm (w)63mm (l)2400mm".

 

Ranking and points

There will be 3 minutes for a robot to finish the course. Each robot will have 3 attempts; each attempt will be timed separately and the best result will be used for scoring. For each contact with a wall the robot will be penalized by 10 seconds, but this penalty will be limited by a total of 30 seconds. Points will be awarded according to the rankings.

Challenge 2: Pick-and-place

 

Aim of the challenge

A soft sponge is installed in an upright position in a holder platform. The center of the sponge is located on top of a straight black line with width of 50 mm. The side facing the robot is of a light colour and reflects light quite well. A robot is placed at some distance along this straight line from the sponge and the sponge holder, so that no part of the robot is crossing the starting line.

 

The robot should drive straight along the black line, stop in front of the sponge, grab it with a gripper or any other similar appliance, take the sponge out of the holder (the easiest way is to just drive backwards), then turn either left or right (to be announced on the competition day), take the sponge over the next black line and release it.

 

The height of the sponge is around 7 cm. To accommodate different sizes of the grippers, there are 2 kinds of sponges - a rectangular one with the width of 5.5 cm, and an inverted T-shape one with the width in the upper part of around 4 cm. Participants can select whichever type of the sponge to use, depending on the construction of the robot.

 

The height of the platform is 1.5 cm, so the gripper should be located at least 2 cm above the floor.

 

Ranking and Points

There will be 5 minutes for a robot to finish the course. Each robot will have 3 attempts; each attempt will be timed separately and the best result will be used for scoring. Points will be awarded according to the rankings.

 

Only the complete sequence of actions will be considered for scoring; in the end, the sponge should not be touching any part of the robot and should be located on or behind the bounding black line. If a robot does not manage to complete the course in 3 attempts, it will be given 0 points for this competition.

OUR SCHOOL

ABOUT US

The London School of Mathematics and Programming is a unique institution that helps children aged 4 to 18 to develop their intellectual and cognitive skills. We offer independent courses in Mathematics, Programming, Robotics and Early Intellectual Development.

 

Our teaching approach is highly systematic. We make sure each subject is thoroughly learned and understood so our pupils solve problems through logic rather than memorizing theory.

 

Our aim is to help children understand and love mathematics and coding, be inventive, open-minded and strive to think outside the box. To achieve this we provide an engaging and enriching environment in which children can develop their abilities far beyond the ordinary.

 

To find out more about the school visit www.londonsmp.co.uk.

Bonus Task: Remote Controlled Delivery

 

Aim of the challenge

A remote controlled robot will be provided for this competition.

 

Participant should control this robot to navigate a maze shown on the left, taking a golf ball from the lower left corner of a maze to the upper right. At the start of the obstacle course the robot and the ball are separate.

 

In the case a ball goes out of bounds of the field or it is stuck in any obstacle in such a way that a robot cannot retrieve it, the ball will be recovered by a judge and placed near to the place where it was stuck in a convenient position. There will be a 20 seconds penalty for each recovery.

 

Ranking and Points

There will be 3 minutes for a robot to finish the course. Each participant will have 2 attempts; each attempt will be timed separately and the best result will be used for scoring. Points will be awarded according to the rankings.

CONTACTS

CONTACT US

The London School of Mathematics and Programming,

37 Kensington High Street, London W8 5ED (Rossotrudnichestvo office).

The London School of Mathematics and Programming,

37 Kensington High Street, London W8 5ED (Rossotrudnichestvo office).

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